HOME  |  NEWSLETTER  |  FEEDBACK  |  ABOUT US  |  REGISTER   
Please contact:
David Williams
Global Director of Sales, Research
858-829-8612
or via email at:
insider@
lightreading.com
HEAVY READING CABLE INDUSTRY INSIDER
HEAVY READING COMPONENTS INSIDER
HEAVY READING IP SERVICES INSIDER
HEAVY READING SERVICE PROVIDER IT INSIDER
HEAVY READING 4G/LTE INSIDER
HEAVY READING MOBILE NETWORKS INSIDER
HEAVY READING
LIGHT READING
Networking the Telecom Industry
HEAVY READING
Real World Research
LIGHT READING LIVE!
Live Events on the Road
WEBINARS
Free Web Seminars
Why Drones Won’t Be Putting You Out of a Job… Yet
Danny Dicks | Analyst
Interest in the commercial drone industry is growing, and technology is developing quickly.

This is laying the foundation for a range of future drone-based applications, including the use of drones in communications networks.
more

Connected Drones… Seriously
The capability of drones to carry out an increasing range of tasks, and to make some existing processes simpler, cheaper and more effective, means that there is a wave of innovation and development happening around the world. Much of the innovation concerns the ways drones are connected – to each other, to the remote "pilot" and to other systems for control and use of data gathered from the drone. There are examples of drone-based services for monitoring, surveying (and surveillance), precision agriculture and logistics in many industries, and for environmental and humanitarian activities. Most intriguing of all, perhaps, is the potential for drones to act as nodes in public communications networks – extending the concept of battlefield airborne communication to the permanent delivery of connectivity in unserved or underserved locations.

This industry has been – and still is – looking for clear and sympathetic regulation of commercial drone activity. In particular, the U.S. FAA's views have been eagerly awaited: a draft was released in February 2015 following a period during which there were a few case-by-case exemptions granted to a blanket ban. Such regulation has a big influence over the fate of drone hardware manufacturers, component makers and a raft of providers of software platforms and services who are developing offers in the expectation of market take-off.

Despite the rapid progress in the drone market in the last two to three years, in many respects there are still more challenges than solution, still more questions than answers. But there is progress being made in many areas – particularly on the technology side and in clarifying market structures and value.

The major brake on the development of commercial drones is regulation: We have waited a long time for the FAA to produce its draft rules (though several exemptions from current restrictions in the U.S. have been granted), and most other countries' regulations are similarly restrictive. Until the regulations are clear, and resolves issues relating to autonomous flight and control beyond line-of-sight, commercial drones will not fulfil their potential.

There may be too many technology companies chasing too small a market for the next five years and we expect to see the start of consolidation in 2016 as drone hardware and, particularly, software startups' early stages funding runs out. The experience of Octoblu and its acquisition by Citrix – which surely has ideas much wider than drone management – is a lesson. There are lots of good technology developments happening out there, and they won't go to waste, but there will be fewer drone-focused tech companies standing this time next year.

Connected Drones… Seriously examines the emerging market for commercial, connected drones. It describes the emerging value chains and functional stratification of the technologies that make up a modern connected drone. It examines the most significant issues facing the commercial drone sector – in particular related to connectivity – and summarizes what is happening in the development of drones as network nodes. It reviews the supply-side landscape of the industry, and profiles 14 companies – from very small start-ups to giant technology corporates – that are working in the connected drone space.
Sample research data from the report is shown in the excerpts below:
Table of Contents (hri0415_toc.pdf)
Specific roles in the industry are becoming clearer as the small-drone industry develops from a hobbyist base to a commercial and professional market, as the military drone industry looks to expand into commercial opportunities and as new applications for drones are developed. Hobbyists initially bought drones to fly them; now they are much more likely to want the drone to be an enabler of some other activity, often involving photography or video filming. And the photography/videoing is also itself a means to an end for many users. Furthermore, the vertically integrated drone solutions typical of the military approach aren't necessarily right in a more price-sensitive, open-culture civilian world.
[click on the image above for the full excerpt]
Companies profiled in this report include: AeroVironment Inc. (Nasdaq: AVAV); Airware (Unmanned Innovation Inc.); The Boeing Company (NYSE: BA); Da-Jiang Innovations Science and Technology Co. Ltd. (DJI); DreamHammer Inc.; DroneDeploy (Infatics Inc.); Facebook Inc. (Nasdaq: FB); Google Inc. (Nasdaq: GOOG); Matternet Inc.; Northrop Grumman Corp. (NYSE: NOC); Parrot SA (Euronext: PARRO); PixiePath Corp.; SkyCatch Inc.; and Skydio Inc.
Total pages: 24
JANUARY 2015
Hot Market Sectors to Watch in 2015
This report identifies 10 "hot areas" for 2015, highlights interesting developments in 2014, explains why each the market sector is likely to sizzle this year, how warm the temperature will get and how the sector can be expected to impact carriers, service providers and vendors in the coming year.
READ SUMMARY
Including table of contents, executive summary, and financial metrics
JANUARY 2015
Next-Generation PON: Status & Prospects
This report examines technology developments and standardization efforts for the next generation of PON, and considers which technologies will be used, and for what. It looks at how specific markets for next-gen PON will evolve, and compares vendors' focus and portfolios. Finally, it profiles 13 leading suppliers of PON equipment.
READ SUMMARY
Including table of contents, executive summary, and financial metrics
DECEMBER 2014
Utilities & Gigabit Cities: A Market Sizing Report
This report assesses the size of the U.S. utility sector by providing a state-by-state list of U.S. utilities spanning all categories, and identifies market opportunities for technology vendors in the utility sector. This report focuses on opportunities driven by the Gigabit Cities trend and the FTTH network deployment activity of municipally owned and co-op utilities.
READ SUMMARY
Including table of contents, executive summary, and financial metrics
CONTRIBUTING ANALYST
Simon Sherrington
Simon is an independent consultant who contributes regularly to Heavy Reading Insider. He has 13 years of experience analyzing, reporting, and consulting on technology market trends.
MORE
Simon Sherrington
CONTACT AUTHOR
CONTRIBUTING ANALYST
Danny Dicks
Danny is an analyst and consultant with over 20 years' experience in technology markets who contributes regularly to Heavy Reading Insider.
MORE
Danny Dicks
CONTACT AUTHOR
ANALYST
Tim Kridel
Tim writes for both Mobile Networks Insider and Cable Industry Insider. He has previously covered the wireless and cable industries for a number of research firms, including Heavy Reading.
MORE
Tim Kridel
CONTACT AUTHOR
"I like the detailed reviews and comparisons of products. ... It's a great reference tool."
- Derek Sheeler, Analyst, Olayan Group
"Great service that combines the information I need/want to know, in a concise format that doesn’t require me to set aside valuable time digging through a lot of filler."
- Barry Kantner, Vice President, World Wide Packets
PRIVACY POLICY   TERMS OF USE
HOME  |  NEWSLETTER  |  FEEDBACK  |  ABOUT US  |  REGISTER